The Hunt for Pink October



Wow, it's been awhile. I hope everyone is doing well. The weather has been beautiful the last few days, and it really has really felt like fall.


On Sunday there was also an amazing gathering of friends to celebrate and show support for my husband's battle with ALS. The event was organized by people close and dear to me and I am so grateful for them.


My husband's battle with ALS has been nothing short of heroic. It is a horrible disease. I have heard comments that ALS is the "worst " of afflictions. I am not so sure about that, but it definitely ranks way up there.


Unfortunately, there are many horrible medical conditions that are debilitating and heartbreaking. For the first time in a long time, I do not want to focus on Covid. The Covid numbers are declining rapidly, and it looks like the Delta variant is more in our rear view mirror.


However, the hospitalizations remain at record level as people are requiring medical care from other very serious conditions. I myself, had a recent scare with melanoma, so I cannot emphasize enough the need to get your yearly skin checks from your dermatologist.



But since this is breast cancer awareness month, I want to take a moment to highlight breast cancer. Many women are behind schedule on their mammograms. This is due to several factors.


For starters, many mammograms were cancelled during the pandemic during the shutdowns. Then, once the vaccines became available, we began to see a phenomenon called lymphadenopathy which was affecting mammogram results in those who were vaccinated, which could lead to unnecessary additional studies and unwarranted worry for the patients.


To prevent these unnecessary studies, recommendations were made to postpone yearly mammograms for several months after a vaccine shot. However, the importance of monthly self breast exams and yearly mammograms cannot be understated as breast cancer continues to afflict many women.


Early detection is so important for successful outcomes. We have seen a trend in recent years towards more breast conserving treatments, namely lumpectomies and radiation. It is important for any breast cancer patient to weigh their options for treatment and to understand the risks, benefits, and limitations of the various treatments.


Even with breast conservation surgery, women may still benefit from reconstructive procedures to help with symmetry concerns, and often these surgeries are covered by insurance.


I have always encouraged both my breast reduction and breast augmentation patients to return for yearly breast checks, even if patients think it unnecessary, as a way to increase breast cancer surveillance.


To encourage women to make those yearly appointments, we are